Thursday, February 25, 2010

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

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This week, in Randy Seaver’s column, Digging For Answers, he tackles the question:  How deep must bodies be buried to prevent health problems and/or scavenging?


A:  My first off-the-cuff answer was "six feet under" but then I wondered where that term came from.  According to the site City of the Silent:

"Six feet under was the depth formerly required by English law. It was intended to ensure that the corpse did not spread the plague or other diseases which might have led to its decease."

A BBC site [no longer active] about the plague of 1665 summarized the rules set by the Lord Mayor of London to limit the outbreak, and included the mandate that all graves should be at least six feet deep.


Be sure to read Randy’s entire article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Slate Tombstone Carver David Gillespie

“Nothing in this life, nothing we see with our eyes, will last forever, but with stonecutting, you have some chance to perpetuate through the ages.”

~ David Gillespie~


Yesterday, Lee Drew of FAMHIST sent a link via Twitter to this amazing article and the photographs it contains. David Gillespie of Pickens County, South Carolina, is a stone carver and still practices the art of hand chiseling head stones and shingles from large slabs of slate.

The photographs are amazing and well worth a look. The article can be found in the Anderson, South Caroline, Independent Mail, with the photo gallery displayed here. Enjoy!

Monday, February 22, 2010

One Of Family Tree Magazine's 40 Best Genealogy Blogs


Votes are in for the Family Tree Magazine 40 Best Genealogy Blogs and The Association of Graveyard Rabbits is honored to announce that our blog has won in the Cemetery category. Where else would you find a Graveyard Rabbit?

Family Tree Magazine's Maureen Taylor (The Photo Detective) wrote:

These stellar bloggers explore the mysteries shrouding graveyards, tombstones and burial practices.

A voter said “This is the ‘mother blog’ to a fast-growing group of people documenting local cemeteries, their inhabitants and all things related to graveyards and funeral customs.” The stories are fascinating, the documentation effort impressive and the contributors a most interesting bunch.

This is a group award for all who contribute. Congratulations!
Online Journal Editor
Julie Tarr
Online Journal Creative Director
footnoteMaven
Contributors
History Hare
footnoteMaven
Tech T.I.P.
Denise Olson
Graveyard Guru
Stephanie Lincecum
Photo Monument
Julie Tarr
Graveyard Rabbit Carnival
Julie Tarr
Digging For Answers
Randy Seaver
The Educated Rabbit
Sheri Fenley
Meet A Rabbit
Sheri Fenley
Rabbit's Tale
Various
Graveyard Rabbit Newsletter
Diane Wright
Gale Wall



Congratulations to Granite in My Blood Blogger Midge Frazel (a charter Graveyard Rabbit) for also winning in this category.

Saturday, February 20, 2010

Reminder – GYR Carnival Submissions Due 2/25

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Just a friendly reminder that submission for the March 2010 edition of the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival are due February 25th.  I’ve received quite a few submissions already, but am eager to see more!

The topic for the March 2010 edition of the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival is:  Forgotten Cemeteries.

This idea came from Tina Michael Ruse, who authors the blog Campo Santo-holy ground, The Graveyard Rabbit of Alta California.

This topic can be approached from many different angles.  You could write about little-known cemeteries in your area, share photographs of unkempt cemeteries, talk about a restoration project for a forgotten cemetery, or perhaps discuss the impacts of forgotten cemeteries on historical and genealogical research.

Submit your post to the carnival using the submission form.  Submissions for this edition are due by February 25.  Be sure to include a short description of your post in the “remarks” section of the submission form.

Thursday, February 18, 2010

New Article Available at the GYR Online Journal

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In this week’s column, The Educated Rabbit, Sheri Fenley shares with us some books that are available for free online.


I really tried to find just one book about cemeteries or funeral customs or tombstones to review. However, when I went searching at some of my favorite places, there were just too many to choose from.


Be sure to read the entire article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

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This week, Julie Cahill Tarr share symbols of love in her column, Photo Monument.  Be sure to check out her article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Thursday, February 4, 2010

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

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This week, Denis Olson discusses electronic publishing in her Tech T.I.P. column.  Find out how you can publish information iteratively using Scribd.


Thanks to the benefits of electronic publishing, family historians don’t have to wait until they have all the details before publishing a family history project. Now we can publish what we have and later, when our research provides more detail, easily publish a new edition. To make my point, I’ll use my current cemetery project, the Huguenot Cemetery Guide.


Be sure to read the entire article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Monday, February 1, 2010

Call For Submissions – GYR Carnival March 2010 Edition

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The topic for the March 2010 edition of the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival is:  Forgotten Cemeteries.

This idea came from Tina Michael Ruse, who authors the blog Campo Santo-holy ground, The Graveyard Rabbit of Alta California.

This topic can be approached from many different angles.  You could write about little-known cemeteries in your area, share photographs of unkempt cemeteries, talk about a restoration project for a forgotten cemetery, or perhaps discuss the impacts of forgotten cemeteries on historical and genealogical research.

Submit your post to the carnival using the submission form.  Submissions for this edition are due by February 25.  Be sure to include a short description of your post in the “remarks” section of the submission form.

Upcoming Topics

  • April 2010 – Anonymous Graves
    (idea submitted by Henk van Kampen)
  • May 2010 – Cause of Death
    (idea submitted by Matt Hucke)
  • June 2010 – The Interesting, The Odd, The Beautiful
    (idea submitted by Gale Wall)
  • July 2010 – Scavenger Hunt
    (idea submitted by Julie Cahill Tarr)
  • August 2010 – Favorite Season
    (idea submitted by Henk van Kampen)

Call For Help

We are in need of more topics for the GYR Carnival.  Please submit your ideas to Julie.

Graveyard Rabbit Carnival – February 2010 Edition

GYRBadge[1] Welcome to the February 2010 edition of Graveyard Rabbits Carnival.  The topic for this edition is Cemetery Critters.  This theme was submitted by Diane Wright, who authors three GYR blogs:  The Kansas Rabbit, The Wright Graveyard Stew, and The Grave Yard Rabbit Travels Wright.

Bloggers were asked to post photographs of critters they’ve caught in the cemetery.  There is a wide variety of critters presented by the 14 authors who participated this month; everything from birds to squirrels, even cattle!

So grab that favorite beverage, sit back, and enjoy the show!


M. Diane Rogers presents Graveyard Critters – The Graveyard Rabbit Carnival posted at The Graveyard Rabbit of British Columbia, Canada, saying, "Some critters in cemeteries are memorable or beautiful, some are very common, a few (like bears and snakes) are to be avoided, and some are just plain surprising.”

Evelyn Yvonne Theriault presents Symbols On Catholic Cemetery Headstones: The Dove posted at A Canadian Family, saying, "Finding peace, redemption and purity in my Catholic cemeteries."

Rurh Coker Burks presents Cemetery Critters posted at Last2cu.

Dorene Paul presents Graveyard Squirrel in Oakland Cemetery posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay, saying, "While visiting Oakland Cemetery doing "Graveyard Rabbit" research, I came across this frisky graveyard squirrel."

Linda Hughes Hiser presents Graveyard Rabbits Carnival--Cemetery Critters posted at Flipside, saying, "Cemetery critters and wandering dog and a stone bird."

Robin Inge presents Christmas Morning..... posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Wichita County, Texas, saying, "I have to say, this was probably the funniest scene I had ever seen. I'm use to seeing deer and rabbits around the cemetaries because of where I live and really cattle and livestock is not uncommon to see out running loose here either. However, not near a cemetery and this particular group had walked about a mile to get to some grass...this happened to be during our Christmas Blizzard."

Melissa Burney presents Searching for Long Lost Relatives: Old Bethel Cemetery posted at Journey Through the Past Beauty of Cemeteries, saying, "I stumbled across this snake while walking Old Bethel in Kentucky."

Midge Frazel presents Eagle posted at Granite in My Blood, saying, "Although not a "real" critter, I find this soaring eagle on a plaque on a rock in a cemetery to be meaningful for all us Graveyard Rabbits."

Diane Wright presents Critters at the Cemetery posted at The Grave Yard Rabbit Travels Wright.

Gale Wall presents GYR Carnival - Cemetery Critters posted at Digital Cemetery Walk, saying, "My first post of a cemetery critter was in July 2009. It was, of course, a graveyard rabbit! I often encounter critters on my cemetery walks. Be sure to click on my "critters" label to see the other posts."

Matthew Kear presents Tolomato Cemetery posted at Facebook Events, saying, "This remarkable place is Tolomato Cemetery in St. Augustine, Florida. The Mickler obelisk was the favored perch for this bird that liked to watch me work in the mornings, when I was completing an inventory of the site for my thesis back in 2007."

Stephanie Lincecum presents Reviving an Old Post about Cemetery Critters (GYRabbit Carnival) posted at Southern Graves, saying, "I've seen dogs, cats, foxes, squirrels, and insects galore during my cemetery trips. Wild turkeys, though? That was a first for me."

Amy Crow presents The Graveyard Rabbit in Etna Cemetery posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Central Ohio, saying, "I think the title says it all: "The Graveyard Rabbit in Etna Cemetery" :-)"

Julie Cahill Tarr presents Cute Critters in the Cemetery posted at Cemeteries of Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, saying, “I’ve found some critters in cemeteries during my adventures.  Most often, the little buggers are to quick for me and I miss them (or get a really blurry shot).  But here are the few I’ve managed to get, and fortunately, some of them sat still!”


That concludes this edition. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.  Be sure to join us for the next edition!