Thursday, December 31, 2009

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

Julie Cahill Tarr explores the deeper meaning of some unique symbols found on grave markers, in her column Photo Monument.


I’m always intrigued by symbols on grave markers.  There are the typical ones, such as a cross or flowers.  In the instance of a cross, one might assume the deceased had a belief in a higher being.  Flowers on the other hand, may or may not specify anything affiliated with the person.  Different types of flowers hold some sort of meaning, for instance, daisies typically signify a child’s grave.  Flowers could simply be pretty decor.  When I come across unique symbols, I find myself wanting to know more about the person.


Be sure to read the entire article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Reminder – GYR Carnival Submissions Due 12/25

I’m posting this reminder a few days earlier than I normally do since the holiday season is upon us.  I already have a few submissions, but would like to see more for our first member-submitted topic.

The topic for the January 2010 edition, is The Final Resting Place.  This theme comes from Colleen McHugh, author of the GYR blog, The R.I.P.PERS.  Colleen wants us to investigate how families determine their final resting place.  She goes on to say:

In today's mobile society, does one choose a place near where they last lived? Or do they return to the place of their roots? Do they rest in a family plot? If so, and if married, whose family plot? How has the determination of the final resting place changed between the time of our ancestors and now?

Colleen poses some excellent questions, which I’m sure will get a lot of varied responses for this carnival edition. 

As always, write a blog post that address this edition’s theme and submit it to the carnival using the submission form.  Submissions for this edition are due by December 25.  Be sure to include a short description of your post in the “remarks” section of the submission form.

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

 

This week, Denise Olson shares some strategies for cemetery inventories in her column Tech T.I.P.  Denise also explains how to use Find A Grave’s Excel template to upload batches of records.


I recently rediscovered several cemetery inventories that were part of the papers in my aunt's estate. She and her sister had been involved with their local historical society and had participated in a county-wide project to inventory the county's cemeteries. The inventory documents I have are probably 25-30 years old. They are typewritten on onion skin paper—legal size at that. There's also a hand-drawn cemetery map (also in legal size) included with the inventory. There are only four cemeteries included in this package of documents, probably because each appears to have some family members buried in them. I also have several headstone photos from the cemetery where the most of our family are buried. This can only mean one thing…Find A Grave!


Be sure to read the entire article at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal







“Secure the shadow ere the substance fade.”

by footnoteMaven


"I Think She's Dead Series"

On Shades Of The Departed I wrote a series of articles based on the photograph above, titled "I Think She's Dead." The photograph was analyzed and Victorian postmortem photography was discussed.

Some of the discussion led to questioning how the photographing of the dead was actually accomplished and whether dead bodies were transported to the photographic studio. I have spent a good deal of time researching old photographic magazines looking for articles written by photographers and their experience photographing the dead.

I've found some interesting information and if you're not squeamish read on.

Thursday, December 3, 2009

New Article Available in the GYR Online Journal

This week, Stephanie Lincecum discusses the death wail in her column, Graveyard Guru.


The death wail is a custom attributed to several different cultures that I have been interested in learning more about. Though I did not find a singular “guru” to help me on this quest for knowledge, I hope you’ll allow me to share with you my findings in this column format.

Wikipedia describes the death wail as “a keening, mourning lament, generally performed in ritual fashion soon after the death of a member of a family or tribe.” Examples of this have been found in numerous societies and date back many centuries.


This is a very interesting article, so be sure to read it in its entirety at the Graveyard Rabbits Online Journal.

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

2009 GeneaBlog Awards


Last year Tamura Jones of Modern Software Experience created the GeneaBlog Awards.

This year, The Graveyard Rabbit Association is honored to have won the award for Most Successful Genealogy Blog.

This description accompanied the award:
The Graveyard Rabbit is the blog for The Association of Graveyard Rabbits. It was started late in 2008, and now there are more than eighty Graveyard Rabbit blogs already. Visit it for the regular blog posts, the Graveyard Rabbit Online Journal or the long list of Graveyard Rabbit blogs.

The Association of Graveyard Rabbits is a group effort by a dedicated core of members. So on behalf of everyone involved in GYRabbits, thank you Tamura, for this honor!

Editor
Julie Tarr

Creative Director
footnoteMaven

Newsletter
Diane Wright

Facebook
Henk Van Kampen

History Hare
footnoteMaven

Tech T.I.P.
Denise Olson

Graveyard Guru
Stephanie Lincecum

Photo Monument
Julie Tarr

Digging For Answers
Randy Seaver

The Educated Rabbit
Sheri Fenley

Rabbit's Tale
Various



Congratulations To All The GeneaBlog Award Category Winners:

Most Successful Genealogy Blog: The Graveyard Rabbit

Best Genealogy Vendor Blog: Generation Maps' The Chart Chick

Citation Queen: footnoteMaven

Geekiest Genealogy Blog: Me and My Database :: Geek Genealogy

Honourable mention: The Gramps Project Blog

Most Personal YouTube Genealogy Channel: Elyse Doerflinger

Honourable mention: Climb Your Tree by Lucy.

Most Challenging Blog: Forensic Genealogy

Best Looking Magazine: Shades of the Departed Magazine

Call For Submissions – GYR Carnival January 2010 Edition

 

Wow.  It’s hard to believe 2009 is drawing to a close.  With the dawn of a new year, we’re changing things up a bit for the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival.  Instead of our lovely carnival hostess deciding the topics each month, we’re enlisting the help of the GYR members to contribute ideas for upcoming themes.  So if you have an idea for a carnival topic, please email Julie Cahill Tarr.

Our first member-submitted idea, for the January 2010 edition, is The Final Resting Place.  This theme comes from Colleen McHugh, author of the GYR blog, The R.I.P.PERS.  Colleen wants us to investigate how families determine their final resting place.  She goes on to say:

In today's mobile society, does one choose a place near where they last lived? Or do they return to the place of their roots? Do they rest in a family plot? If so, and if married, whose family plot? How has the determination of the final resting place changed between the time of our ancestors and now?

Colleen poses some excellent questions, which I’m sure will get a lot of varied responses for this carnival edition. 

As always, write a blog post that address this edition’s theme and submit it to the carnival using the submission form.  Submissions for this edition are due by December 25.  Be sure to include a short description of your post in the “remarks” section of the submission form.

Upcoming Topics

  • February 2010 – Cemetery Critters
    (idea submitted by Diane Wright)
  • March 2010 – Forgotten Cemeteries
    (idea submitted by Tina Micheal Ruse)
  • April 2010 – Anonymous Graves
    (idea submitted by Henk van Kampen)
  • May 2010 – Cause of Death
    (idea submitted by Matt Hucke)
  • June 2010 – The Interesting, The Odd, The Beautiful
    (idea submitted by Gale Wall)
  • July 2010 – Scavenger Hunt
    (idea submitted by Julie Cahill Tarr)
  • August 2010 – Favorite Season
    (idea submitted by Henk van Kampen)

Graveyard Rabbits Carnival – December 2009 Edition

Welcome to the December 2009 edition of Graveyard Rabbits Carnival.

The theme for this edition is:  In the News.  Bloggers were asked to write a blog post about something they read or heard in the news (recent or past) that pertains to a cemetery.  It could be news of a relocation, vandalism, a famous burial—anything goes.

We have ten submissions covering many aspects of cemetery news.  Some are current events, while others are quite old (one even dates back to the mid-1800s!).  So grab a beverage of choice, sit back, and read some news!


Dorene Paul presents 1852 Ad in Sandusky Newspaper about Oakland Cemetery posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay, saying, "An ad in an 1852 Sandusky newspaper offers residents the opportunity to have their loved ones reburied at Oakland Cemetery, for a reasonable fee."

Midge Frazel presents In the News posted at Granite in My Blood, saying, "Exciting news about cemeteries is hard to find but I found one about a local woman photographing gravestones plus an article about Westerly RI and its quarry where my ancestors toiled."

Rurh Coker Burks presents two posts for this edition.  The first, An Arkansas Saint...To Be posted at Last2cu, about an Arkansas nun who is soon to be a Saint.   Her second post is Carl Johnson posted at Last2cu, she says, "Carl Johnson was a community leader here in our small town of Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas. Not only was Carl a leader, he was a mentor and a true friend. Owning the only dry cleaners in town, Carl knew everyone and everything going on and was able to guide this town in the direction that it needed to go at any given time."

Silvia Pettem directs us to an article written for the Denver Post entitle After 55 years, Boulder Jane Doe's story finally coming together, saying, "From Silvia Pettem, the historian mentioned in the article and author of Someone's Daughter: In Search of Justice for Jane Doe."

Denise Olson submitted two entries for this edition.  The first, In the News: Who’s Burying Who? posted at The Graveyard Rabbit of Moultrie Creek, she says, "Trying to place her father's ashes in the local national cemetery turned into quite a drama."  Her second post, Wreaths Across America posted at The Graveyard Rabbit of Moultrie Creek, she says, "Wreaths Across America is an annual event to honor Americans who served our country by placing a Christmas wreath on their graves."

Janet Iles presents Cemeteries in the News - Edgehill Cemetery posted at Graveyard Rabbit of Grey County, Ontario, saying, "Edgehill Cemetery in Bruce County made the news at the end of last year but I am wondering how the recovery is going."

M. Diane Rogers presents My Story's Buried at the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival posted at The Graveyard Rabbit of British Columbia, Canada, saying, "Not all cemeteries are for humans, and not all cemetery land is protected from future sale and development."

Julie Cahill Tarr presents Unearthed Tombstone Dated 1843 posted at Cemeteries of Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, saying “An interesting article written in 1926 about the discovering of a tombstone during the excavation of a cellar.”


That concludes this edition. Past posts and future hosts can be found on our blog carnival index page.  Be sure to join us for the next edition!